Pediatric Femoral Fracture Registry Project2018-10-17T14:07:32+00:00

Pediatric Femoral Fracture Registry Project (PedFemFx)

Summary
There is wide variation in the preferred management of femoral shaft fractures in children, with little evidence about the comparative effectiveness of different treatments for pediatric femur fractures. There is an imperative to collect prospective data to generate higher quality evidence.

 The purpose of this registry is to collect the clinical outcomes (fracture healing & patient reported outcomes and complications) of the treatment of isolated femur shaft fractures in children up to skeletal maturity. Health economic aspects will also be evaluated to give possible recommendations from a health economic perspective.

Additionally, this registry aims to:

  • Test the feasibility of the proposed registry in the selected sites to be implemented in the future on a broader scale
  • Analyze the AO Pediatric Long Bone Fracture Classification in terms of utility for treatment decision and prediction of fracture outcomes
  • Validate a new patient reported outcome measure: PROOF-LE (Patient Reported Outcomes of Fracture Healing – Lower Extremity)

Learn more about the instrument used in the PedFemFx Project on the PROOF-LE™ page.

Interested in participating?

Recruitment is ongoing.

  • Who can participate? Children less than 16 years of age seen at the Orthopaedic Fracture clinic of the Hospital for Sick Children for the treatment of a femur fracture. The parents / primary caregivers of these children may also be invited to participate by completing questionnaires.
  • What is involved? Some children, their parents and various health care professionals with expertise in fractures may be asked to participate in interviews regarding the questionnaire and the items in it. Others will be asked to complete a questionnaire about fracture healing.

If you are interested in participating or have additional questions, please contact us. Contacting us does not obligate you or your child to participate in the study.

Acknowledgements

This research has been supported by funding from: