Get to know Dr. Paul Nathan

Dr. Paul Nathan, a paediatric oncologist at SickKids, shares the importance of research pertaining to the long-term outcomes in survivors of childhood cancer, also known as “late effects.”

Addressing the needs of childhood cancer survivors

The majority of children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer will survive. Consequently, there is a growing population of childhood cancer survivors in Canada and around the world. Unfortunately, many of the treatments we use to cure cancer can lead to long-term physical and psychological health problems known as “late effects”. Childhood cancer survivors require life-long follow-up care that is focused on their risks for late effects in order to maximize their health and quality of life. My team’s research is focused on understanding these long-term risks and exploring ways to ensure that all survivors receive the health care and other support that they need.

 

Addressing the needs of adolescents and young adults with cancer

Adolescents and young adults (AYA; aged 15-39 years) are a particularly vulnerable group of cancer patients who have not seen the same improvements in their cancer outcomes as younger children and older adults. The Nathan Team leverages Ontario’s health administrative databases and cancer registries to study outcomes in AYA with cancer across their cancer trajectory from diagnosis through treatment to survivorship.

There are approximately 19,900 Ontarians previously diagnosed with cancer as children or adolescents as of January 2017. 25% of them are 0-19 years old, 40% are 20-39 years old and 35% are 40 years or older.

Source: Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario. Childhood Cancer in Ontario: The 2020 POGO Surveillance Report. Toronto: Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario; 2020. For more information about the burden of childhood cancer in Ontario, including statistics related to childhood cancer incidence, mortality, survival and prevalence, please see the POGO Surveillance Report.

Get to know Dr. Paul Nathan

Addressing the needs of childhood cancer survivors

The majority of children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer will survive. Consequently, there is a growing population of childhood cancer survivors in Canada and around the world. Unfortunately, many of the treatments we use to cure cancer can lead to long-term physical and psychological health problems known as “late effects”. Childhood cancer survivors require life-long follow-up care that is focused on their risks for late effects in order to maximize their health and quality of life. My team’s research is focused on understanding these long-term risks and exploring ways to ensure that all survivors receive the health care and other support that they need.

 

Addressing the needs of adolescents and young adults with cancer

Adolescents and young adults (AYA; aged 15-39 years) are a particularly vulnerable group of cancer patients who have not seen the same improvements in their cancer outcomes as younger children and older adults. The Nathan Team leverages Ontario’s health administrative databases and cancer registries to study outcomes in AYA with cancer across their cancer trajectory from diagnosis through treatment to survivorship.